How can activists in 8 countries learn collectively about community-led research?

(Left photo) A drawing featuring mining communities and their development priorities in Zimbabwe by Kundai Chikonzo. (Right photo) A drawing representing a collaborative approach and support to achieve human rights and justice by CCMS in Armenia
  • What should be addressed or improved to help you prepare and meaningfully engage during the training both logistics and content?
  • What three things would you like to learn or improve on community-led development planning?
  • What questions do you have about community-led research? What would you like to get clarity or upskill on community-led research?
  • What are other topics you would like to be added to the training sessions?
  1. Introduction and Getting to Know Each Other
  2. Understanding Community-led Development
  3. Community-led Research Design
  4. Power Analysis and Identifying Allies and Potential Opponents
  5. Intersectionality Approach to Gender and Climate Justice
  6. Participatory Data Collection
  7. Risk and Security
  8. Building People’s Power for Community-led Development
  9. Individual Check-in on Community-led Research Design
GAT members, Advisory Group, IAP staff, and interpreters getting to know each other to kick off online learning sessions.

“I am not your data, nor am I your vote bank,

I am not your project, or any exotic museum object,

I am not the soul waiting to be harvested,

Nor am I the lab where your theories are tested…”

We started the Participatory Data Collection session by reading the powerful poem “I am not your data” by Abhay Flavian Xaxa, an Adivasi rights activist to remind and reinforce our efforts in making the research genuinely community-led. We then explored how to design tools for effective data collection that are easy for the community to do, what we need to consider, and a question posed by one of the members. Everyone brought in their own experiences with different tools and approaches. We counted 20+ tools that everyone has used. As responded by one participant, one of strategies in working with indigenous women and female elders is to gather data during their daily activities such as interviews during women’s activities in the kitchen can bring many stories.

  • Who makes decisions about steps in research–how, where, and when?
  • Do the tools allow research participants to freely express themselves? Do they exclude certain groups of people?
  • Is it possible to disaggregate the data by gender and other elements of diversity and intersecting identities?
  • What risk the research team and participants may face while gathering data?

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IAP is a human and environmental rights organization that works with communities, civil society and social movements to change how today’s development is done.

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IAP

IAP

IAP is a human and environmental rights organization that works with communities, civil society and social movements to change how today’s development is done.